12 Polished Oregon Pinot Noir Wines | Tasting Highlights | News & Features | Wine Spectator

12 Polished Oregon Pinot Noir Wines | Tasting Highlights | News & Features | Wine Spectator
Kent Derek Studio
Oregon Pinot pioneer Adelsheim was founded in 1971.

Scores and tasting notes for Oregon Pinot Noir from Willamette Valley, including the Chehalem Mountains and Yamhill-Carlton District subzons, reviewed by Wine Spectator senior editor Tim Fish.

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New reviews of 2014 and 2015 reds from Willamette Valley

Source: http://www.winespectator.com/webfeature/show/id/12-Polished-Oregon-Pinot-Noir-Wines-55177

Wine news July 27, 2017

Wine news July 27, 2017
The Smithsonian on the Mexican American wine revolution. “Amelia Ceja was 12. It was 1967, and she had just immigrated to the Napa Valley from Jalisco, Mexico.” 
Metal Injection on Ozzy Osbourne wine. “It seems to be a bit of a joke that Ozzy Osbourne would release a wine considering he’s a recovering alcoholic, but the release actually makes sense.”
The Boston Globe on how Total Wine has won a legal challenge on discount pricing. “A Boston judge has ruled that Massachusetts alcohol retailers can legally sell booze at deep discounts when they order it in bulk, rebutting state regulators who said the practice can violate a state law that prohibits selling alcohol at less than cost.”
Decanter on the wines billionaire superyacht owners are buying. “Summer 2017 in the Med, and it’s Champagne and rosé that account for at least 50% of requests. Italian wine is next. The names that keep coming up are Bollinger rosé, Cristal, Moët Ice, Domaine d’Ott, Garrus.”
Vogue says visit Rioja, Spain. “With so much on offer, it’s a bit surprising, then, that La Rioja isn’t an American tourist destination on par with Bordeaux or Tuscany—though, as so often happens with under-the-radar gems, that may soon change.”
The Drinks Business reports on Rabobank’s report that US exports to the EU fell double digits.  “However there was good news for France, which saw volume exports rising 5.9% in the first quarter of 2017 with a 14.7% rise in value sales. This highlighted an increase in the average price of around 8%, it said, although the average price of wine to the UK rose by 10.6% per Litre.”

Wine news July 27, 2017Wine news July 27, 2017Wine news July 27, 2017

Source: https://grapecollective.com/articles/wine-news-july-27-2017

Sinfire Apple Cinnamon Whisky

Sinfire Apple Cinnamon WhiskySinfire Cinnamon Whisky, a brand of Hood River Distillers Inc., expanded its offerings with the introduction of Sinfire Apple Cinnamon Whisky. The authentic whisky is made with natural apple cinnamon flavor and finished with glacier-fed spring water from Mt. Hood in Oregon, the company says. The 35 percent alcohol-by-volume whisky is packaged in 750-ml bottles that have a suggested retail price of $15.99 nationwide.
Hood River Distillers Inc., Hood River, Ore.Telephone: 541/386-1588Internet: www.hrdspirits.comDistribution: National 

Sinfire Cinnamon Whisky, a brand of Hood River Distillers Inc., expanded its offerings with the introduction of Sinfire Apple Cinnamon Whisky. 

Source: http://www.bevindustry.com/articles/90401-sinfire-apple-cinnamon-whisky

Southern Rhône 2016 Vintage Preview: Domaine de Mourchon | Stirring the Lees with James Molesworth | Blogs | Wine Spectator

Southern Rhône 2016 Vintage Preview: Domaine de Mourchon | Stirring the Lees with James Molesworth | Blogs | Wine Spectator
Photo by: James Molesworth
Domaine de Mourchon is a value star in the Southern Rhône.

It’s always fun to taste the wines from the established estates that set the benchmark for their respective appellations. But the Southern Rhône is a huge wine region, with scads of values from equally hard-working vignerons.
Walter McKinlay, now 84, continues to run Domaine de Mourchon, the winery he founded in 1998. It’s a family affair, with his son-in-law Hugo helping out. Sébastien Magnouac handles the winemaking.
McKinlay has continued to cobble together parcels in the hills above the charming town of Séguret, most of them situated on distinctive blue marl limestone soils. The estate now totals 89 acres of vines producing about 11,000 cases annually while a small négociant side of the company adds another 4,500 cases. For more background, reference my notes from my visit here in 2012.
The 2016 Côtes du Rhône-Villages Séguret Tradition has been blended and is now being aged before bottling. Expect lively plum and blackberry fruit with a touch of licorice through the finish and a light stony spine to keep it honest. Aged entirely in concrete vats to preserve the fruit expression, it’s a textbook introduction to the house style here: ripe, juicy textured wines that overdeliver at their price points. This bottling typically retails for under $20.
The 2016 Côtes du Rhône-Villages Séguret Grande Réserve includes some 65-year-old Grenache vines. Combining 65 percent Grenache with Syrah, it gets a touch of wood aging—20 percent in 600-liter demi-muids (none new). It offers a deeper core of kirsch and plum sauce flavors with a licorice-coated finish.
The two main red varieties here are also offered alone, with the 2016 Côtes du Rhône-Villages Séguret S Family Reserve sourced from the estate’s oldest Syrah vines, planted in 1970. It starts with a bright violet note and gives way to a sanguine thread before letting its core of juicy blackberry and plum fruit take over. The ganache-edged finish has ample depth but stays focused.
Its sibling is the 2016 Côtes du Rhône-Villages Séguret G Family Reserve, which uses the estate’s oldest Grenache vines. As with the Syrah bottling, this is fermented and then aged in wooden vat. It offers a huge core of kirsch and sweet tobacco flavors with ganache, tar and licorice-fueled finish. It’s gutsy and rich, but has the overall freshness of this exciting vintage.
McKinlay, who has personally worked the U.S. market over the years, has seen the benefits of his labor come to fruition—his tasting room (open to the public) is busy “with so many Americans these days,” he says.
And despite a recently replaced hip, McKinlay seems as keen as ever on his winery. I asked him what keeps him going. “That’s easy. Just keep doing things and enjoy life. And is there a better business than this to do that in?”
Follow James Molesworth on Twitter, at twitter.com/jmolesworth1, and Instagram, at instagram.com/jmolesworth1.
Domaine de Mourchon’s Côtes du Rhône-Villages bottlings overdeliver

Source: http://www.winespectator.com/blogs/show/id/Rhone-France-Wine-Mourchon-2016

SND: As Millennial Tastes Shift, Wine and Spirits Are Edging Out Beer | News | News & Features | Wine Spectator

SND: As Millennial Tastes Shift, Wine and Spirits Are Edging Out Beer | News | News & Features | Wine Spectator
A Goldman Sachs report sent brewer stock prices plummeting by forecasting brighter times for wine and whisky

A new report from Goldman Sachs forecasting a weak outlook for the American beer market is making waves across the drinks industry. Released earlier this week, the report cites changing Millennial tastes—which are shifting away from beer in favor of wine and spirits—as a key factor behind beer’s slowdown, which has been ongoing but seems to be accelerating this year.
Goldman has downgraded its expectations for the beer market over the next two years, anticipating volume declines. The softness is largely being driven by mainstream domestic brands such as Budweiser, Miller Lite and Coors Light. And growth in the craft-brewing segment, which has been the darling of the beer industry the past several years, has decelerated significantly.
Beer’s shrinking sales come as wine and spirits continue to steal share within the drinks industry. According to Impact Databank, a sister publication of Wine Spectator, the U.S. wine market is slated to expand 1.1 percent to 330 million cases this year, while spirits are set to rise 2.5 percent to 228 million cases. Wine’s growth is being driven by California wines retailing above the $10 mark, as well as the burgeoning sparkling wine segment, which is expected to rise 8 percent to a new record of 22 million cases this year.
These trends are being driven primarily by consumers under 34 years old—who are drinking less than prior generations did at their age—as well as the 35- to 44-year-old segment, which is often opting to consume wine or spirits over beer, according to the Goldman report.
For more details on what this means for consumers and an in-depth analysis of the report, visit Shanken News Daily.
A Goldman Sachs report sent brewer stock prices plummeting by forecasting brighter times for wine and whisky

Source: http://www.winespectator.com/webfeature/show/id/As-Millennial-Tastes-Shift-Wine-and-Spirits-Are-Edging-Out-Beer

How is the term “estate” regulated on wine labels in the U.S.? | Ask Dr. Vinny | Wine Spectator

How is the term “estate” regulated on wine labels in the U.S.? | Ask Dr. Vinny | Wine SpectatorDear Dr. Vinny,
How is the term “estate” regulated on wine labels in the U.S.?
—Lampsidis A., Athens, Greece
Dear Lampsidis,
There’s only one scenario where the term “estate” is regulated by the Alcohol, Tobacco, Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB for short) of the federal government. That’s when a wine is labeled as “estate bottled.” In order to call a wine “estate bottled,” specific criteria must be met: First, 100 percent of the wine has to come from grapes grown on land controlled or owned by the winery; second, the grapes have to be crushed, fermented, aged and bottled in a continuous process all in the same place; finally, all of that has to happen in the same American Viticultural Area, or AVA, that’s listed on the bottle. An estate-bottled wine can’t use broader appellations like just listing it is from the United States or California.
Outside of that, wineries use “estate” in ways that aren’t regulated. Typically, the term refers to a scenario in which a brand owns and farms its own vineyard and uses those grapes in their wine (versus just purchasing grapes). I think most of the time, it’s used in that spirit correctly, as a way to communicate to wine lovers an expectation of consistency, as well as a particular style of wine that’s dedicated to expressing a site (versus a style that’s focused on blending grapes from different vineyards together). Then again, since the term isn’t regulated in that way, I can call a wine label Dr. Vinny’s Estate Winery and technically not own a single vine.
—Dr. Vinny

Source: http://www.winespectator.com/drvinny/show/id/How-Is-Estate-Wine-Term-Regulated-55175