Italian Zucchini Casserole

Italian Zucchini Casserole Nutritional Facts

3/4 cup: 174 calories, 9g fat (3g saturated fat), 10mg cholesterol, 576mg sodium, 17g carbohydrate (7g sugars, 3g fiber), 8g protein.

Compliments crop up as fast as zucchini vines when folks sample this casserole. Even those who generally don’t like zucchini find they enjoy it in this savory side dish. —Kimberly Speta, Kennedy, New York

Source: https://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/italian-zucchini-casserole

Italian Zucchini Casserole

Italian Zucchini Casserole Nutritional Facts

3/4 cup: 174 calories, 9g fat (3g saturated fat), 10mg cholesterol, 576mg sodium, 17g carbohydrate (7g sugars, 3g fiber), 8g protein.

Compliments crop up as fast as zucchini vines when folks sample this casserole. Even those who generally don’t like zucchini find they enjoy it in this savory side dish. —Kimberly Speta, Kennedy, New York

Source: https://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/italian-zucchini-casserole

What Is the Difference Between Crostini and Bruschetta?

What Is the Difference Between Crostini and Bruschetta? Ok, confession time. Embarrassing as it is to admit as a “food professional,” up until about a week ago I really didn’t think there was a difference between bruschetta and crostini.
Honestly, I’d written it off as a matter of semantics. You say tow-may-tow, I say tow-mah-tow, that kind of thing. Because I mean, consider the stats: Both dishes are of Italian origin and follow the same basic formula of savory or sweet topping served on a slice of toasted bread. Right? Am I crazy? What am I missing here?
Well, it turns out what I was missing had to do with the bread—the type, size, and toasting method, to be exact. Bruschetta, which comes from the Italian word bruscare (aka “to roast over coals”), is traditionally made using a thick slice of rustic Italian or sourdough-style bread. And, as the origin of the name suggests, the slices were typically grilled over a fire to achieve a nice, crunchy char. In its most basic, traditional version, the grilled bread is rubbed with a clove of raw garlic, quickly showered in good-quality olive oil, and seasoned with thick flakes of salt. This is called Fett’unta, and most would agree it’s the best garlic bread you’ll ever taste.
Crostini (aka “little toasts”), on the other hand, is rarely, if ever, eaten without a topping or spread. The bread used is usually smaller and more round-shaped, like a baguette, and is cut into significantly thinner slices. Toasting usually takes place on a baking sheet in the oven.
While you could argue that both are cocktail party-friendly starters, crostini are definitely intended to be the more bite-sized, finger-food snack.
So in the end it wasn’t all that egregious of a misunderstanding. Check out the following recipes to really celebrate what truly unites and equalizes these two: How tasty and versatile they are.
Tomato Bruschetta

Chowhound

When you have a dish that can be interpreted as widely and creatively as bruschetta, the sheer volume of choice in direction can be overwhelming. So why not keep it simple, chef, and start with the classic tomato version? Diced juicy-sweet tomatoes and aromatic basil piled onto a slice of garlic and olive oil-rubbed crusty bread: Who needs more than that? Get our Tomato Bruschetta recipe.
Burrata and Cherry Tomato Bruschetta

Ciao Florentina

Do you ever look at the components of Caprese salad and think, “This is great and all, but where the heck are my carbs?” Cool, me too. Thankfully, this recipe for burrata and cherry tomato bruschetta presents an elegant, cocktail party-friendly solution. The creamy, oozier style of mozzarella gets an A+ score for spreadability, and is the perfect foil for the concentrated flavor of the roasted cherry tomatoes. (Of course, if burrata isn’t your thing—hey, to each their own—the concept works just as well with a firmer style of mozzarella.) Get the recipe.
Chili Lime Sweet Corn Bruschetta

Bubbly Hostess

Bruschetta is one of those great blank canvas concepts that adapts easily to whatever bounty the season has to offer. In the fall, you might turn to a mixture of spiced apple and butternut squash as a topping. Winter might take you to a variation topped with braised greens like kale, or richly sauced mushrooms. By spring, you can dress it up with earthy peas and ricotta or snappy grilled asparagus. And, of course in the summer, best to keep it light and bright and fresh with everyone’s favorite: Fresh corn. This elote-inspired bruschetta cleverly combines chili-lime marinated corn kernels with mild queso fresco to create a can’t-help-but-love-it summer starter. Get the recipe.
Tuna and Cannellini Bean Bruschetta

Chowhound

Desperately raiding your pantry for quick culinary inspiration because your pals just texted that they’re popping by for a quick drink and snack? Grab the cans of tuna, cannellini beans, and loaf of Italian bread, follow these instructions, and you’ve got yourself a bruschetta that tastes like it was thoroughly well-planned and not just thrown together. Get our Tuna and Cannellini Bean Bruschetta recipe.
Breakfast Bruschetta with Fontina-Scrambled Eggs and Salami

Chowhound

If you think bruschetta is only suitable as early evening hors d’oeuvres, I am not sorry to tell you that your are sorely mistaken. Take this recipe, for example: Soft, fontina-laced scrambled eggs and crispy strips of deliciously salty, savory salami come together over grilled bread as a delightfully brunchable dish. (Pssst. Insider tip: You can get creative with poached eggs here too.) Get our Breakfast Bruschetta with Fontina-Scrambled Eggs and Salami recipe.
Peach and Hazelnut Mascarpone Bruschetta

Chowhound

Get a glimpse of bruschetta’s sweet side with this dessert-appropriate rendition. Sweet, Frangelico-spiked mascarpone cheese fills in at the base in place of the typical mozzarella or ricotta, and is then topped with slices of ripe peach, honey drizzle, and chopped hazelnuts. Get our Peach and Hazelnut Mascarpone Bruschetta recipe.
Crostini di Fegatini (Chicken Liver Crostini)

Chowhound

Save this one for when your die-hard Italian food-loving friends come over. The traditional antipasti snack is a celebration of bold, pungent flavors, combining ingredients like chicken liver, anchovy, and capers into one wonderfully savory spread. Get our Chicken Liver Crostini recipe.
Smoked Salmon and Herb Cheese Crostini

Little Broken

Give the bagel a break and instead enjoy its frequent partners—smoked salmon and herbed cheese—on a crostini. Slices of crisp radish and cucumber are introduced here as well to provide a welcome layer of freshness and texture. Get the recipe.
Serrano Ham and Membrillo Crostini

Chowhound

Take your crostini on a detour through Spain with this sweet and savory rendition. The opposites-attract combo of sugary quince paste, salty slices of Serrano ham, and Manchego cheese shavings is a fail-safe cocktail party winner. Get our Serrano Ham and Membrillo Crostini recipe.
Olive Artichoke Crostini

Vanilla and Bean

Turn the volume up on your tapenade game with this easy-to-make, textured spread that hits all the flavor high notes. Salty and briny from the combination of black olives and capers is tempered nicely by the mild, delicate flavor of the artichoke hearts, while the garlicky crostini base provides the requisite crunch. Get the recipe.
Ratatouille Crostini

Chowhound

Why limit your topping inspiration to one vegetable, when you can have a medley? This summer veg-driven ratatouille emphasizes freshness and clarity of flavor by simply seasoning the mixture of diced zucchini, eggplant, red onion, and tomato with lemon and basil. Get our Ratatouille Crostini recipe.
Roasted Fig and Ricotta Crostini

PBS

Roasting improves upon the perfect, simple sweetness of fresh figs by adding a subtle caramelized flavor. Pair that with rich ricotta, a little honey, and chopped pistachios for texture, and you’ve got yourself the makings of a perfect dessert crostini. And when the season has passed, give it a go with fig jam instead. Get the recipe.
— Head photo illustration by Chowhound, using: Herbivoracious/Inspired Taste.
Ok, confession time. Embarrassing as it is to admit as a “food professional,” up until about a week ago I really didn’t think there was a difference between bruschetta and

Source: https://www.chowhound.com/food-news/186249/what-is-the-difference-between-crostini-and-bruschetta/

Punch is Making a Comeback and We Don’t Hate It | FN Dish – Food Network Blog

Punch is Making a Comeback and We Don’t Hate It | FN Dish – Food Network Blog Punch is back. And we’re not talking the ubiquitous red drink of unknown origins from classic 80’s movie high school prom scenes that someone inevitably gets pushed into. Totally customizable to your palate and party-type, punch is a crowd pleaser from summer cookouts to black-tie events.
The big-batch drink we know today is a descendant of a Hindi drink made of five ingredients – tea, liquor, water, sugar and lemon – which was popularized during the British empire’s rule in India. Mariners loved the stuff for all of the obvious reasons but also, thanks to a dose of citrus, punch’s ability to ward off scurvy during long trips at sea.
And while punch has seen waves of popularity since then, it has been a staple of all types of events and parties for good reason.
Signature cocktail without the shackles. Setting out a bowl of punch achieves a signature cocktail without having to man the bar cart – guests can serve themselves and you can enjoy the party.
Cut down on costs. A little bit of liquor goes a long way. Have half-empty bottles of spirits from parties past? Plenty of punch recipes call for more than one type, so you’ll be able to use up what you already have on hand in a way the whole crowd can enjoy. Bonus: most guests will be satisfied with the options of beer, wine or punch – there’s no need to stock the bar with tons of other options.
Ditch the ice bucket. Plan ahead and make a large ice cube that does double duty in the punch bowl: it keeps the punch cool throughout the day and looks adorable. Fill your mold – a freezer-friendly baking pan, bowl or Bundt pan all work well here – with ice cubes, fruit garnishes and fruit juice or wine (depending on the type of punch) so it won’t dilute the punch too much as it melts. Layering fruit and ice cubes will prevent all the fruit from falling to the bottom of the mold as it freezes. Use muffin tins stuffed with herbs or fruit garnishes as an ice cube tray that will add flavor and aesthetics to the beverage.
Now that you’re good and thirsty, take a look at some of our favorite punch recipes below.
Rum Punch (pictured above)At its most basic, rum punch is a mix of orange juice, pineapple juice, grenadine and, as the name would suggest, rum. This version kicks things up a notch with homemade spiced rum, which doubles as an excellent hostess gift the next time you go to a party.
Good Eats Company PunchThis punch is based on the original Hindi drink popularized in the British empire in the 1600s. Sweetened tea gets a kick from Batavia Arrack, a predecessor of rum made from sugar cane and fermented red rice and one of the original spirits to ever be used in punch.
Sangrita with a Pineapple-Lime IcebergThis summery mashup of two classic cocktails – sangria and margaritas – keeps cool throughout your entire party thanks to a massive iceberg of frozen pineapple, lime and pineapple juice that won’t water down the punch as it melts.
Hurricane PunchTake a trip to the Big Easy without leaving your house. The Hurricane, a classic New Orleans cocktail, varies by the person making it, but the two key flavors are passion fruit and rum.
Raspberry Lime PunchThis bright and refreshing punch can be made in advance, minus the seltzer which should be added right before serving.
Grapefruit Long Island Iced TeaThis classic cocktails gets its name from the combination of several liquors and cola which turns a similar color as brewed tea. Made here in punch form, the addition of grapefruit and fresh mint put an adult twist on this party favorite.
Watermelon Punch KegThe ultimate party hack: punch a tap into a whole watermelon and watch guests go crazy for this potent punch made of watermelon puree, rose wine and orange-flavored vodka.
From formal events to backyard barbecues, punch is a party favorite for the ages.

Source: http://blog.foodnetwork.com/fn-dish/2017/07/punch-is-making-a-comeback-and-we-dont-hate-it/

Seven-Fruit Salad

Seven-Fruit Salad This refreshing fruit medley, lightly coated with cherry pie filling, makes a great potluck or picnic dish. “You can substitute other fruits, such as red grapes or bananas, and use strawberry pie filling instead of cherry,” notes Martha Cutler of Willard, Missouri, who adapted her grandmother’s recipe.
This refreshing fruit medley, lightly coated with cherry pie filling, makes a great potluck or picnic dish. “You can substitute other fruits, such as red grapes or bananas, and use strawberry pie filling instead of cherry,” notes Martha Cutler of Willard, Missouri, who adapted her grandmother’s recipe.

Source: https://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/seven-fruit-salad?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+feed-low-fat-recipes+%28Taste+of+Home+-+Low+Fat+Recipes%29

How to Pickle Vegetables

How to Pickle Vegetables Now is the perfect time to get yourself in a pickle. Don’t worry, I’m talking about the good kind.
If you haven’t already learned, summer is the ideal season to put those super fresh vegetables to good use by learning how to pickle them. And it’s not as hard as you might think.
When it comes to pickling veggies, there’s two options you can choose from: quick pickling or fermented pickling. Quick pickling (like the name suggests) is an easy and simple process. It’s the basic definition of a pickle: a food that’s been preserved in salt/salty water or an acid like vinegar or lemon juice. This is known as a basic brine, which is usually equal parts of vinegar and water—but it’s up to you to decide the ratio you want. All you need to do is throw these saturated veggies in the fridge for a few days, and there’s no need to can or seal them.
Fermented pickling, on the other hand, is a much more elaborate process. With fermentation, veggies are preserved to last for a much longer amount of time. There’s another difference: during fermented pickling, the veggies don’t go straight to the fridge. First, they need to be kept in a sealed-tight jar (a.k.a that cute mason jar you have lying around) at room temperature for a few days. You’ll know when they’re ready to be placed in the fridge when you see bubbles throughout the jar (don’t panic, this is not a bad thing). It might take longer than the more basic pickle, but you’re also enhancing the nutrient content of your food through fermentation.
Yes, any vegetable can be pickled. But remember: not all are the same when it comes to this cooking method. Veggies like cucumber, ginger, and red onion can just be thinly sliced, while others like green beans should be blanched before you begin the process.
Now the flavors that you choose to combine in your pickle is where the true magic happens. Craving a fresher taste? Try adding some herbs like dill, thyme, oregano or rosemary. Craving a spicier flavor? Go to town with spices like peppercorns, mustard seed, turmeric, smoked paprika, or some ginger. And we mustn’t forget the garlic!
If you’re tickled by the pickle, here are some recipes for you to try:
Pickled Red Onions

Chowhound

Onions are a staple for so many dishes, and this pickle recipe brings out the tangy, crunchy goodness that we all love. These babies pair excellently with pork, or as a topping to tacos or burritos. Get our Pickled Red Onions recipe.
Basic Napa Cabbage Kimchi (Kimchee)

Chowhound

This traditional Korean dish involves pickling Napa cabbage and daikon radish using fermentation, but the longer process is worth it as you’ll be using this in a variety of dishes—like alongside some tender, braised short ribs. Get our Basic Napa Cabbage Kimchi recipe.
Quick-Pickled Jalapeños

Chowhound

Spice up your summer with these pickled jalapeños. They’ll jazz up just about any meal and will only take about an hour in the fridge to marry with the brine. If the summer heat isn’t enough for you, throw in some peppercorns for an added kick. Get our Quick-Pickled Jalapeños recipe.
— Head photo: Chowhound.
Now is the perfect time to get yourself in a pickle. Don’t worry, I’m talking about the good kind. If you haven’t already learned, summer is the ideal season to

Source: https://www.chowhound.com/food-news/186241/how-to-pickle-vegetables/

A Beginner’s Guide to French Pastries

A Beginner’s Guide to French Pastries The pastry case at a French bakery can hold a dizzying array of baked goods. There are breads, cakes, and cookies—all with their own unique origin stories and techniques. To help guide us through five iconic viennoiseries and patisseries, we consulted renowned pastry chef Dominique Ansel, owner of two of New York City’s most popular French bakeries (and yes, Cronut creator).
Macaron

Just a few years ago, the macaron was declared a trending dessert as more and more shops specializing in the almond-flour sandwich cookie popped up here in the U.S. But the delicate treat traces its history back to the 1500s, when queen Catherine de Medici introduced the macaron—first created in Italian monasteries—to France.
You’ll have to be patient with these airy meringue cookies, typically filled with ganache or jam. “The trick with macarons is not to fill them and then eat them right away. The ganache needs to sit and temper between the cookies in the fridge for at least a day, so you can that soft and slightly chewy texture on the inside, while the outer edges stay crisp,” advises Ansel.
Kouign Amann

The name itself looks intimidating, but Ansel simply likens the kouign amann (pronounced queen ah-mon) to “a caramelized croissant.” The sweet, flaky pastry was born in the northern area of Brittany as a way to repurpose leftover bread, but the one you see in shops today is far lighter, made from a technique called lamination, “the process of folding and layering the dough with butter and sugar.” The key to getting a crunchy, buttery kouign amann is speed: “The moment the sugar hits the dough, it starts to draw out the liquid, so you have to work really fast in order to get all those flaky layers in the end. If you have warm hands, chilling them with an ice pack before working the dough helps.”
Éclair

The starting point of an éclair is the same as profiteroles (cream puffs) and gougères: a pâte à choux that’s made from flour, milk and eggs. The choux pastry dough itself is fairly flavorless, serving as the perfect vehicle for a variety of glazes and cream fillings. “I remember years ago when I was first working at Fauchon in Paris under Christophe Adam, he really started to change the way that French people were thinking of éclairs, using different flavors, creative ingredients and decor.”
When it comes to making éclairs, it’s crucial to keep them uniform. “One way to make sure of this is to fold your parchment paper to create even lines or mark it with a ruler and then turn over the parchment before piping,” says Ansel. Also important? “Overfilling each eclair is always better than underfilling!”
Madeleine

A specialty of Commercy (a town in France’s northern Lorraine region), the humble madeleine got its moment in the spotlight thanks to writer Marcel Proust, who waxed poetic about the petite tea cake—no, it’s not a cookie!—in his book “Remembrance of Things Past.”
Though it requires a special pan, the fluffy shells are made from straightforward ingredients (butter, flour, sugar, a touch of lemon zest), plus a hot oven. “Heat up your molds in the oven first before piping the batter, so that the centers puff up nicely. We bake ours to order for our guests. They take just four minutes and when you take a bite, the madeleine gives off a tiny puff of steam, its last little breath.”
Cannelé

One of Ansel’s favorite pastries, the cannelé is distinguished by both its unique shape and texture. A bite into the crispy, caramelized exterior reveals a flan-like center that’s flavored with vanilla. The recipe originated in Bordeaux and calls for a special copper mold that’s seasoned with beeswax to help create a cannelé’s signature golden-brown color.
When it comes to the baking, technique is important. “It’s a one-batter recipe, with just a few ingredients—ours has a bit of dark Caribbean rum and Tahitian vanilla for added depth in flavor—but you have to remember to mix the batter slowly so the air bubbles remain tiny, and let the batter rest for about 24 hours so that the gluten can relax. And while they’re in the oven, make sure to rotate the sheet pan every 15 minutes for uniformity and even baking. ”
— All photos by Patty Lee
The pastry case at a French bakery can hold a dizzying array of baked goods. There are breads, cakes, and cookies—all with their own unique origin stories and techniques. To

Source: https://www.chowhound.com/food-news/186225/a-beginners-guide-to-french-pastries/

Pasta and Bean Picnic Salad Recipe | SimplyRecipes.com

Pasta and Bean Picnic Salad Recipe | SimplyRecipes.com
Pasta and Bean Picnic Salad! This is a spin on classic pasta salad with a white beans, fresh summer vegetables, and a light vinaigrette. No mayo.

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Photography Credit: Sheryl Julian

A picnic table without pasta salad feels like something is missing. You can put out all kinds of beautiful dishes, but pasta salad has to be one of them. It’s dependable, kids love it — and so does Nana.
This recipe combines pasta with beans and fresh vegetables for a more substantial picnic salad. The dressing is a simple vinaigrette – no mayo – so the flavors stay fresh and bright.

I like to use a small hollow pasta like pipe rigate, which are stubby little curlicues that look like the end of a pipe! I like that the beans magically fall into the round openings when you stir and serve the pasta, as if you had painstakingly placed them there.
This said, you can also use any of the flat or corkscrew shapes – penne, fusilli, rotini, cavatappi – or pretty bow-ties.
Prep work for this salad is minimal. You just need to cook pasta, make a vinaigrette, chop up some herbs and vegetables, and open a few cans of beans. Mix it all together and serve.
This recipe calls for a pound of pasta and two cans of white beans – it will serve a crowd, for sure! But with any luck, the table will have so much food that you’ll get to take some of your salad back home for lunch tomorrow.

Pasta and Bean Picnic Salad Recipe
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This recipe can be prepared up to a day ahead.

Ingredients
3 teaspoons salt
1 pound small-shaped pasta (curly, twisted, corkscrew, shells, or bow-ties)
7 tablespoons olive oil, divided
2 cans (15-to 16-ounces each) white beans, like Great Northern, navy, or cannellini, drained and rinsed
Zest of 1 lemon
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 heaping teaspoon Dijon mustard
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 pint mixed cherry or grape tomatoes, sliced or cut into quarters
2 stalks celery, halved lengthwise and very thinly sliced
1/2 red onion, very thinly sliced
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley

Method

1 Cook the pasta: Bring a large pot of water with 2 teaspoons of the salt to a boil. Add the pasta and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8 minutes or until the pasta is tender.
Drain but do not rinse; shake the colander to remove excess water.
2 Combine the pasta and beans: Transfer the pasta to a large bowl and sprinkle with 3 tablespoons of the olive oil. Shake the bowl to distribute the oil.
Add the rinsed beans and lemon zest to the hot pasta. Stir the salad gently. Leave to cool.

3 Make the dressing: In a bowl, whisk the vinegar, mustard, remaining 1 teaspoon salt, and pepper. Slowly whisk in the remaining 4 tablespoons oil until it is all added.
Taste for seasoning and add more salt and pepper, if you like.
4 Finish mixing the salad: Pour the dressing over the pasta and beans and stir. Add the tomatoes, celery, onion, and parsley to the pasta mixture and stir gently but thoroughly.
Taste for seasoning and add more salt and pepper, if you like. You can also squeeze some lemon juice over the top if it needs a touch more brightness.

Hello! All photos and content are copyright protected. Please do not use our photos without prior written permission. If you wish to republish this recipe, please rewrite the recipe in your own unique words and link back to Pasta and Bean Picnic Salad on Simply Recipes. Thank you!
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Sheryl Julian
Sheryl Julian is an award-winning writer, editor, and food stylist. She is the former food editor of The Boston Globe, co-author of The Way We Cook, and editor of The New Boston Globe Cookbook. Her food sections won Best Newspaper Food Coverage from the Association of Food Journalists in 2015.
More from Sheryl

Pasta Bean Picnic Salad

A picnic table without pasta salad feels like something is missing. You can put out all kinds of beautiful dishes, but pasta salad has to be one of them. It’s dependable, kids love it — and so does Nana.

This recipe combines pasta with beans and fresh vegetables for a more substantial picnic salad. The dressing is a simple vinaigrette – no mayo – so the flavors stay fresh and bright.

Continue reading “Pasta and Bean Picnic Salad” »

Source: http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/pasta_and_bean_picnic_salad/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+elise%2Fsimplyrecipes+%28Simply+Recipes%29

ATCO Blue Flame Kitchen: Four ways to spice up your steak this summer

ATCO Blue Flame Kitchen: Four ways to spice up your steak this summer
A good steak is really about choosing a good cut of meat and preparing it properly, but if you are looking to serve up your steak with a little pizzazz, here are some of our favourite ways of doing it:
Our Signature Steak Spice combines aromatic fennel seed, pink peppercorns and celery seed with chili powder, garlic powder, smoked paprika and ancho chile pepper to help create a smoky flavour. It works well as a dry rub to help enhance the flavour of your steak prior to cooking, and it can be added at the table as a finishing touch.
Our Thai Red Curry Steak is for the people who love a little spice. Using pre-made Thai red curry paste makes infusing flavour a cinch, while soy sauce, brown sugar, honey and rice vinegar bring out the four tastes — savoury, sweet, sour and umami — that feature prominently in Thai cooking.
Our Lemon Herb Grilled Steak is more subtle and summery, combining lemon juice and white wine with rosemary and thyme. This steak pairs well with a fresh green salad or some lightly grilled vegetables.
Last but not least is our Asian-inspired Mahogany Steak. Serve this sweet and garlicky steak with steamed rice and stir-fried vegetables.
OUR SIGNATURE STEAK SPICE
Our Signature Steak Spice  Calgary Herald

1 tbsp. (15 mL) fennel seed
1 tbsp. (15 mL) pink peppercorns
2 tbsp. (30 mL) chili powder
1 tsp. (5 mL) garlic powder
1 tsp. (5 mL) smoked paprika
1 tsp. (5 mL) salt
1/2 tsp. (2.5 mL) celery seed
1/2 tsp. (2.5 mL) turmeric
1/4 tsp. (1.2 mL) ground ancho chile pepper
Place fennel and peppercorns in a small frypan.  Cook over low heat, stirring frequently, until lightly toasted and fragrant, about 4 to 6 minutes. Transfer fennel and peppercorns to a coffee grinder or mini food processor.  Add chili powder, garlic powder, paprika, salt, celery seed, turmeric and ancho chile pepper; grind until blended.  Alternatively, spices may be ground together using a mortar and pestle. Store in an airtight container in a cool dry place.  Use as a rub on beef or as a seasoning.  Makes about 1/3 (30 mL) cup.
LEMON HERB GRILLED STEAK
Lemon Herb Grilled Steak  Calgary Herald
1/4 cup (50 mL) olive oil
3 tbsp. (40 mL) fresh lemon juice
2 tbsp. (25 mL) dry white wine
1 tbsp. (15 mL) rosemary, crumbled
1 1/2 tsp. (7 mL) thyme, crumbled
1/4 tsp. (1 mL) sugar
1/4 tsp. (1 mL) salt
1/4 tsp. (1 mL) freshly ground pepper
1 1/4 lb. (0.625 kg) sirloin steak, 1 inch (2.5 cm) thick
Combine all ingredients except steak in a double plastic bag. Add steak and squeeze bag to coat steak with marinade; seal bag. Let stand 30 minutes. Remove steak from marinade and pat dry; discard marinade. Grill steak over medium heat on natural gas barbecue to desired doneness. Serves 4
MAHOGANY STEAK
Mahogany Steak Calgary Herald
1/4 cup (50 mL) soy sauce
1 tbsp. (15 mL) fancy molasses
1 tbsp. (15 mL) oil
1 tsp. (5 mL) sesame oil
1 tsp. (5 mL) freshly ground pepper
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 1/2 lb. (0.75 kg) sirloin steak, 1 1/2 inches (3.75 cm) thick
To prepare marinade, combine all ingredients except steak. Pour marinade into a heavy zip-lock plastic bag. Add steak and squeeze bag to coat steak with marinade. Let stand for 30 minutes. Remove steak from marinade; discard marinade. Grill steak over medium heat on natural gas barbecue to desired doneness. Serves 4 to 6.
THAI RED CURRY STEAK
Thai Red Curry Steak Calgary Herald
1/4 cup (50 mL) soy sauce
2 tbsp. (25 mL) packed golden brown sugar
2 tbsp. (25 mL) oil 
2 tbsp. (25 mL) honey
2 tbsp. (25 mL) rice vinegar
1 tbsp. (15 mL) Thai red curry paste
1 lb. (0.5 kg) sirloin steak, 1 inch (2.5 cm) thick
To prepare marinade, whisk together all ingredients except steak.  Pour marinade into a heavy zip-lock plastic bag.  Add steak and squeeze bag to coat steak with marinade.  Let stand for 30 minutes.  Remove steak from marinade; discard marinade.  Grill steak over medium heat on natural gas barbecue to desired doneness.  Serves 3 to 4.
ATCO Blue Flame Kitchen’s column on healthy eating for busy families runs Wednesdays in the Calgary Herald’s food section. Look for our From Our Roots cookbook in stores and online. For tips on cooking, food safety or household matters, call 1-877-420-9090 toll-free, email bfkanswerline@atco.com or chat with us live online at ATCOBlueFlameKitchen.com.
  A good steak is really about choosing a good cut of meat and preparing it properly, but if you are looking to serve up your steak with a little pizzazz, here are some of our favourite ways of doing it: Our Signature Steak Spice combines aromatic fennel seed, pink peppercorns and celery seed with […]

Source: http://calgaryherald.com/life/food/recipes/atco-blue-flame-kitchen-four-ways-to-spice-up-your-steak-this-summer

Shredded Beef Sandwiches

Shredded Beef Sandwiches Nutritional Facts

1 sandwich: 354 calories, 10g fat (2g saturated fat), 59mg cholesterol, 714mg sodium, 40g carbohydrate (0 sugars, 2g fiber), 26g protein. Diabetic Exchanges: 3 lean meat, 2-1/2 starch.

Cola is the secret ingredient in this delicious slow-cooked beef. Coated with a well-seasoned sauce, the tender meat gets its zip from chili powder and cayenne pepper. —Marie Basinger of Connellsville, Pennsylvania

Source: https://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/shredded-beef-sandwiches